Measuring Bravo’s Cross-Channel Success on Social Media

Measuring Bravo’s Cross-Channel Success on Social Media Lucy Hitz Blogger Extraordinaire Simply Measured

bravo_blogBravo does an incredible job of linking televised content to social media, from asking fans to Tweet questions at Housewives reunion shows to posting #AskAndy vines of popular host Andy Cohen, all in an effort to get fans interacting with the reality show-centric channel.

So how can Bravo figure out which programs are getting the most buzz…across all their active social channels? What should they be measuring to get a solid snapshot of their successes on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and YouTube?

Here are the need-to-knows metrics for success, with serious applicability for any brand active on more than one social network and specific relevance for companies with a lot of brands to pay attention to beneath their umbrella. As Nene Leakes would say, YASSSSSSS, HONEY. 

Audience

First, you’ve got to know what your audience growth rate (or attrition rate) looks like across all your active social networks.

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 9.52.15 AMBravo is definitely seeing its highest audience growth rate on Instagram right now, which makes sense since it is a less seasoned social network than the others shown on this chart. Brands are in earlier stages of navigating the network and publicizing their presence there than, say, on Facebook or Twitter.

Another finding that stands out to me here is the sharp uptick in audience growth on YouTube and Instagram on July 29. Why, I wondered? So I checked out Bravo’s airing schedule for July 29. Turns out the epic Real Housewives of New York aired that evening. And that, my friends, is no coincidence.

Outbound & Engagement 

When you’re looking across all your owned channels, getting quick ‘n’ easy visualizations of your engagement is key. Here’s Bravo’s total engagement from July 24-30. 

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 9.56.23 AMAs you can see, Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook rule — in that order. I was surprised that Instagram drove so much engagement — Bravo’s really strong and getting stronger on that network right now.

Another thing to note here is that, while Instagram and Twitter engagement mirror one another in terms of peaks and valleys (which I attribute to TV airing schedules), Facebook has a much more consistent and less peak-heavy engagement demeanor. This can be attributed to Twitter and Instagram’s reputations as “live” social networks that encourage people to post as they watch, especially from mobile devices. Let’s take a look at engagement as a percent of audience for the same time period.

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 10.01.51 AMIt’s not all about the engagement number itself. A cross-channel report offers Bravo a great opportunity to see what they’re doing with the audience they have. They might have a ton of followers — but are they active? Are they interacting? Are they being motivated to comment, Like, or Favorite by what Bravo is posting?

We can see from this chart that Twitter and Instagram are winning this category — maybe for the same reason engagement numbers are so high generally on those networks.

Content

What kind of content is Bravo posting? Which channels are they posting the most on? How does that correlate to engagement? Which times and days are most posts going up — and what’s the reaction look like? Questions answered right here (click to zoom):

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 10.09.59 AMThis chart power combo tells us that Bravo:

  • Posts the most content on Twitter, but splits its video content primarily between YouTube and Facebook
  • Gets more engagement on photos than any other kind of content, most of which is split between Facebook and Instagram
  • Sees its Facebook engagement peak on brand content at 2PM PST
  • Has its slowest engagement day on Wednesday

Among other juicy tidbits.

Keywords

Where is Bravo seeing its hashtags and handles picking up steam?

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 11.01.08 AMTwitter by a landslide, leading me to believe that there is a lot of buzz going on around Bravo that’s not directly connected to posts they’re putting up. This is a good sign that Bravo needs to run a Conversation Driver Analysis to discover what people are saying organically on Twitter.

The Top Ten 

Let’s say Bravo just wants a quick glimpse of what they’re doing right. Everyone loves a top ten list, correct?

Screen Shot 2014-08-06 at 11.02.32 AMThese are Bravo’s top ten posts across all its networks from July 24-30. What we can learn about Bravo’s successful strategies from this selection of top-performing posts:

  • People respond well to #TBT for their favorite stars
  • A good piece of content is a good piece of content: three of the top Instagram posts are identical to three of the top Facebook posts. Repurposing is clearly working for the network
  • Winning = offering relevant prizes for interaction, like the post in slot #6 which asks users to submit 6-second clips in return for a chance to win a trip to NYC for a taping of Watch What Happens Live 
  • Posting day-of, pre-show content drives a lot of engagement, building on audience excitement and a sense of immediacy

How do you get an overview of all the brilliant cross-channel work your brand is doing?

What’s important to you when reviewing your social network activity side-by-side? What are you looking for? Let me know in the comments below, and check out our awesome new Cross-Channel Social Performance Report if you’re in the market for some deep measurement goodness for your own brand. It includes all the charts above, a quick, high-level social scorecard, a drill-down appendix, and more.

Screenshot 2014-08-07 16.33.25

Lucy Hitz

I’m the Content Marketing Manager here at Simply Measured. I manage our blog, produce longform content, head our co-marketing initiatives, and host the Simply Social podcast, among a few other things. I love yoga, The X-Files, peaty scotch, hiking, and poetry. If I were a social media channel, I’d want to be Instagram, but I think I’m Twitter.