Tide Ditched the Super Bowl for Vine…And It Worked

Tide Ditched the Super Bowl for Vine…And It Worked Jade Furubayashi Blogger Extraordinaire Simply Measured

For advertisers, the Super Bowl is as big as it gets. This year, 111.5 million viewers tuned in to the most-watched TV event ever and as usual, brands took their commercials to the next level.

However, in an unprecedented shift, tons of large brands opted out of the $4 million ad-spots and instead, took to Twitter. Buffalo Wild Wings, Arby’s, JCPenney and more all brought their A-game on social.

But among the brands  Tide, an unlikely competitor, stole the show via Vine.

How Tide Used Vine to Advertise During the Super Bowl

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During the game, Tide published 23 Vine Tweets, timed with the commercials from the game, and mentioning the advertisers. This tactic paid off. Tide garnered over 6.6 million potential impressions during the campaign, and it didn’t cost them $4 million.

The trend over recent years has been for brands to pre-release their ads on YouTube, giving fans more than a moment to digest and share these commercials. This was certainly intentional, but what brands might not have anticipated is how other brands would leverage their content. With ample prep time, Tide decided to create Vines centered around the premises of some major commercials. Producing 22 Vines in total, Tide made people question if the ROI of an astronomically expensive Super Bowl ad could be replicated by a low-budget and clever social media campaign.

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The results were impressive: On the day of the Super Bowl, Tide generated 1,174% more engagement than their daily average.

The concept of “newsjacking” a major event like the Super Bowl is not new. Brands have been doing this for years. But what is new and unique is the concept of brands playing off each other’s content. Just like Tide played off of Super Bowl commercials, tons of brands entertained their audience by engaging with each other during the game.

JCPenney’s fake drunk-tweeting ended up creating buzz and getting the attention of brands like Kia Motors and Doritos. This is the first time we’ve seen brands advertising themselves during the Super Bowl by playing off of other brands.

 

This tactic has proved successful when done correctly, and is something we expect to see more of during other events, like The Olympics. Where have you seen brands respond to other brands?

Jade Furubayashi

My name is Jade and I'm the Social Media Manager for Simply Measured. We can find common ground in Beyoncé and Chipotle burrito bowls.